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 Results for DC.creator="G." AND DC.creator="Stubbs" in section 19.5.3 of volume F
Diffracted intensities: polycrystalline fibres
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.6, pp. 584-585 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Diffracted intensities: polycrystalline fibres 19.5.3.6. Diffracted intensities: polycrystalline fibres The intensity in the diffraction pattern of a polycrystalline fibre consists of Bragg reflections on layer lines (Fig. 19.5.2.1b). On each layer line, owing to the lattice sampling that arises from the lateral organization of the polymers, intensities are observed at ...

Diffracted intensities: noncrystalline fibres
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.5, p. 584 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Diffracted intensities: noncrystalline fibres 19.5.3.5. Diffracted intensities: noncrystalline fibres The intensity in the diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline fibre is the cylindrical average of the square of the Fourier transform (Franklin & Klug, 1955): The intensity varies continuously as a function of R along each layer line (Fig. 19.5.2.1a). References Franklin ...

Fourier-Bessel syntheses
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.4, p. 584 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Fourier-Bessel syntheses 19.5.3.4. Fourier-Bessel syntheses Electron densities may be calculated for crystalline fibres, as they are in crystallography, using Fourier syntheses with coefficients determined for the crystalline reflections. For noncrystalline fibres, it is more convenient to use Fourier-Bessel syntheses: the electron density [rho] at point is where References ...

Diffraction by helical molecules
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3, pp. 584-585 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Diffraction by helical molecules 19.5.3. Diffraction by helical molecules 19.5.3.1. Fibre diffraction patterns | | As noted above, the diffraction pattern from a fibre is confined to layer lines because of the repeating nature of the polymer helix. The layer lines in reciprocal space are perpendicular to the fibre axis in real space. ...

Helical symmetry
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.2, p. 584 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Helical symmetry 19.5.3.2. Helical symmetry It is convenient to use cylindrical coordinates to describe helical molecules. In real space we use coordinates (r, [varphi], z); in reciprocal space (R, [psi], Z). By convention, the z axis is the helix axis and the line corresponds to the x axis in Cartesian ...

Fibre diffraction patterns
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.1, p. 584 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Fibre diffraction patterns 19.5.3.1. Fibre diffraction patterns As noted above, the diffraction pattern from a fibre is confined to layer lines because of the repeating nature of the polymer helix. The layer lines in reciprocal space are perpendicular to the fibre axis in real space. The layer line passing through the ...

Structure factors
Chandrasekaran, R. and Stubbs, G.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 19.5.3.3, p. 584 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000871 ]
Structure factors 19.5.3.3. Structure factors Cochran et al. (1952) showed that the structure factor on layer line l of a helix made up of repeating subunits isDiffraction occurs only for and are the real-space coordinates of atom j in the repeating unit of the helix; is the atomic scattering factor ...

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