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 Results for DC.creator="H." AND DC.creator="L." AND DC.creator="Carrell" in section 5.1.2 of volume F
Crystal mounting
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2, pp. 148-150 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
... micropipette. It may even be easier to place 5-10l of solution on a siliconized cover slip or depression well ... slippage in macromolecular crystallography. J. Appl. Cryst. 10, 365. Sawyer, L. & Turner, M. A. (1992). X-ray analysis. In Crystallization ...

Heater
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.2.4, p. 149 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
Heater 5.1.2.2.4. Heater The heater illustrated here consists of a variable rheostat and a heating element. The latter is a short piece of Nichrome wire which has been coiled and attached to the rheostat via wires that run through a ball-point pen barrel. This permits a fine temperature control for ...

Thumb pump
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.2.3, p. 149 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
Thumb pump 5.1.2.2.3. Thumb pump The thumb pump is a simple micropipetting device for transferring very small amounts of liquid in a highly controlled manner, making it an extremely useful tool for directly transferring protein crystals from solution to capillary, thus minimizing the chance of crystal damage. This simple device allows ...

Capillaries
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.2.2, p. 149 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
Capillaries 5.1.2.2.2. Capillaries The capillaries used for crystal mounting are made of thin-walled glass. These capillaries range from 0.1 to 2.0mm in diameter and have a stated wall thickness of 0.01mm. In practice, however, the larger the diameter of the capillary, the thinner the glass wall. Therefore, handling of the ...

Microscope
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.2.1, p. 149 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
Microscope 5.1.2.2.1. Microscope Perhaps the single most important piece of equipment for examining and mounting crystals is a binocular dissection microscope. This should have variable zoom capabilities, and there should be sufficient distance (e.g. 5-10cm) between the objective lens of the microscope and the microscope stage to accommodate the necessary ...

Tools for crystal mounting
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.2, pp. 148-149 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
... and manipulation of crystals. Methods Enzymol. 114, 136-140. Sawyer, L. & Turner, M. A. (1992). X-ray analysis. In Crystallization ...

Introduction to crystal mounting
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.1, p. 148 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
Introduction to crystal mounting 5.1.2.1. Introduction to crystal mounting Once crystals have been obtained and visually characterized, the next procedure involves the transfer of a selected crystal to an appropriate mounting device so that the crystal may be characterized using X-rays. Macromolecular crystals are generally obtained from and stored in ...

Capillary mounting
Carrell, H. L. and Glusker, J. P.  International Tables for Crystallography (2012). Vol. F, Section 5.1.2.3, pp. 149-150 [ doi:10.1107/97809553602060000816 ]
... micropipette. It may even be easier to place 5-10l of solution on a siliconized cover slip or depression well ...

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